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Hardware Tip of the Week; Hot Tips for Vinyl Tile Repair and Auto Leak Diagnosis

Sponsored by:
ISLAND TRUE VALUE TACKLE & HARDWARE
801 N. Lake Park Blvd.   Carolina Beach, NC  28428 Phone: (910) 458-3049  
Fax: (910) 458-0988
www.islandtacklehardware.com

Vinyl floors are beautiful when new. But soon, normal wear, and things that happen here and there, leave rips and gouges, burns and tears, that need attention and repairs.
If you have one or more tiles to replace, removing the vinyl tile -- one or a whole floor -- can be difficult and messy when you use a heat gun and chisel.
Instead, lay a cloth down over one tile at a time, and iron with slow, firm strokes. In a minute or two, the tile will easily lift up.
Then repeat as needed. If you’re replacing with self-stick tiles, they’ll go in easier and hold better if the adhesive is activated with heat.
Use a hairdryer or warm sunlight (if available) until they’re pliable. Then, peel and stick.
For holes, gouges and tears in tile or linoleum, shave a thin top layer off a matching scrap.
Grind or chop it into tiny pieces, mix with clear urethane paint and fill it into the damaged area and let it dry.
In 1859, Edwin Drake brought in the world's first oil-producing well in Titusville, Pa. Ever since, we've used his discovery for almost everything imaginable --notably in and for our automobiles. These days, we find traces of Drake's discovery on the garage floor.
Some are red, some green, while yet others are dark and greasy or clear and thin. We know something's leaking, but what is it that's leaking and what does it mean?
Here's how to use yesterday's news for a do-it-yourself auto diagnosis. Before you pull into the garage, cover the floor with newspaper.
The next morning, after you back out, check the spots. Dark greasy droplets indicate an oil leak.
Clear oily stains might be brake fluids. Red drips are probably transmission fluid, and greenish puddles are anti-freeze in the coolant.
Check the overnight drips for volume and color.
Bonus Tips:
Shower Door Show Biz
There’s something you can do if you have shower doors with grunge and grime and a soapy film that you rather not anyone see.
Here’s a few cleaning tricks to help clear things up.
• First scrub down the glass with lemon oil polish and a scouring pad (it may take some effort to cut through the goo).
• Another good rub-a-dub scrub is sodium carbonate sold in pure form by swimming pool dealers to increase the pH.
• For particularly stubborn mineral stains that may have built up over a long period, tackle one small section at a time by suspending a vinegar-soaked rag from mall suction cups (with clips or hooks) so it hangs up against the film covered glass.
Once it softens the mineral deposits can be removed easily.
Then scrub and re-position the rags to another area.
• Finally, when you’re all through, keep things clean by using a squeegee to remove excess water from both doors and walls after each shower to make your bath a worthy showplace once again.
And that's the tip of the week from Island Tackle & Hardware.