30 Dead Due To Flu Virus In North Carolina From Dec. 28th To Jan. 3rd

30 Dead Due To Flu Virus In North Carolina From Dec. 28th To Jan. 3rd

By / State News / الأربعاء, 14 كانون2/يناير 2015 05:00

RALEIGH, N.C. - If you haven't received a flu shot this season, here is some incentive - 30 people died as a result of the flu virus in North Carolina between December 28th and January 3rd. A total of 54 people have died this flu season.
The New Hanover County Health Department began offering flu shots Tuesday, Sept. 30.
Appointments are available from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday and walk-ins will be gladly accepted.  To schedule your appointment, call (910) 798-6646.
According to health officials, everyone six months of age and older should be vaccinated against the flu annually, especially those with chronic diseases, such as asthma, diabetes and heart disease. Pregnant women and the elderly are also at high risk.
“Getting an annual flu shot is the best way to prevent flu from spreading,” said New Hanover County Deputy Health Director Joshua Swift. “Also, protect yourself and others by covering coughs and sneezes, washing hands frequently with soap and water or hand sanitizer, and staying home and away from others when sick.”
This year, the health department will offer the traditional injectable vaccine for ages 6 months and older, the nasal spray (FluMist) to ages two through 49, and a high dose option to those 65 and older.  The vaccine protects against four flu strains, including the common H1N1 and H3N2 varieties.
Persons with mobility issues can receive the vaccine in their automobile, if requested. You do not have to be a New Hanover County resident to receive a flu shot at the New Hanover County Health Department (910) 798-6529.
Flu vaccines are $45.00 each for age 6 months to 65 yrs. High dose vaccine for patients age 65+ are $60.00. FluMist (intranasal) vaccine is available for patients age 2 to 49 at a charge of $55.00. The health department accepts Medicare/Medicaid, Blue Cross/Blue Shield of NC, United Health Care, Aetna, Cigna, Tricare, Health Choice, cash, check, or Visa/MasterCard (credit or debit). For my information call 910-798-6646.
CDC recommends a yearly flu vaccine for everyone 6 months of age and older as the first and most important step in protecting against this serious disease. While there are many different flu viruses, the seasonal flu vaccine is designed to protect against the main flu viruses that research suggests will cause the most illness during the upcoming flu season. People should begin getting vaccinated soon after flu vaccine becomes available, ideally by October, to ensure that as many people as possible are protected before flu season begins.
In addition to getting vaccinated, you can take everyday preventive actions like staying away from sick people and washing your hands to reduce the spread of germs. If you are sick with flu, stay home from work or school to prevent spreading flu to others.
Encourage your loved ones to get vaccinated as soon as vaccine becomes available in their communities, preferably by October. Vaccination is especially important for people at high risk for serious flu complications, and their close contacts.
Children between 6 months and 8 years of age may need two doses of flu vaccine to be fully protected from flu. Your child’s doctor or other health care professional can tell you whether your child needs two doses.
Children younger than 6 months are at higher risk of serious flu complications, but are too young to get a flu vaccine. Because of this, safeguarding them from flu is especially important. If you live with or care for an infant younger than 6 months of age, you should get a flu vaccine to help protect them from flu.
Flu vaccines are designed to protect against the main flu viruses that research suggests will be the most common during the upcoming season. Three kinds of flu viruses commonly circulate among people today: Influenza A (H1N1) viruses, influenza A (H3N2) viruses, and influenza B viruses.
How long does a flu vaccine protect me from getting the flu?
Multiple studies conducted over different seasons and across vaccine types and influenza virus subtypes have shown that the body’s immunity to influenza viruses (acquired either through natural infection or vaccination) declines over time. The decline in antibodies is influenced by several factors, including the antigen used in the vaccine, the age of the person being vaccinated, and the person's general health (for example, certain chronic health conditions may have an impact on immunity). When most healthy people with regular immune systems are vaccinated, their bodies produce antibodies and they are protected throughout the flu season, even as antibody levels decline over time. Older people and others with weakened immune systems may not generate the same amount of antibodies after vaccination; further, their antibody levels may drop more quickly when compared to young, healthy people. For everyone, getting vaccinated each year provides the best protection against influenza throughout flu season. It’s important to get a flu vaccine every season, even if you got vaccinated the season before and the viruses in the vaccine have not changed for the current season.
For more information on the flu clinic at the New Hanover County Health Department, call (910) 798-6646. For health-related news and information connect with the New Hanover County Health Department on social media: www.twitter.com/nhchealth and www.facebook.com/nhchealth

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