Hardware Tip of the Week: Concrete Chips and Tingles and What’s the Right Setting on a Spreader?

By / Hardware Tips / Wednesday, 06 January 2016 05:00

Sponsored by:
ISLAND TRUE VALUE TACKLE & HARDWARE
801 N. Lake Park Blvd.   Carolina Beach, NC  28428 Phone: (910) 458-3049  
Fax: (910) 458-0988
www.islandtacklehardware.com

When it’s time to start fertilizing again you have to determine the correct setting for your spreader (so you don’t end up with burnt grass later on). Look for your spreader’s listing under “Spreader Settings” in the Directions for Use on the back of the package of fertilizer. If your Scotts spreader’s setting is not listed on the bag, then you can determine which setting to use by conducting this simple test. This test is also helpful if you don’t have a spreader from Scotts.
• First, measure out enough of the fertilizer product to cover 1,000 square feet and put it in your spreader.
• Next, set your spreader on a low setting. (Usually one quarter of the way open is a good starting point.)
• Spread the material you put in the spreader over 1,000 square feet (a 50- by 20-foot area). Ideally the product will run out right when you get to the end of the 1,000 square foot are.
If you have a little left over, just increase the setting a small amount. If you do not have enough to cover the full 1,000 square feet, then you will have to reduce the setting a small amount.
Concrete:
Sooner or later in the course of home repairs you’re going to use a hammer and chisel on concrete. Once you use these tools one of the first things you’ll discover, even if you wear heavy gloves is a persistent “tingle”.
This feeling usually sets in your hands and arms after about twenty or so good hard whacks. To reduce this effect, caused by excessive shock, punch a hole through a child’s sponge-rubber ball and push the chisel through it.
Then when you’re ready to pound away, hold the ball with the other hand and the sponge rubber will absorb the shock.
Before you start hammering also push the tip of the chisel through a square of window screen. When you start chipping away at the concrete, chips and chunks won’t fly all over making a mess and possibly hitting you in the face.
Just to be on the safe side always wear safety goggles and heavy gloves and then say bye-bye to tingles and chips.
Bonus Tip: Grilling Secrets:
Think you know barbecue grilling? Got all the answers for tasty outdoor cooking? Maybe not!
Today you'll learn grilling secrets of the gurus and a few new tricks we'll bet you'll use.
First, do you keep a plant atomizer handy? Maybe you do (filled with water to douse flare-ups), but grilling gurus fill it with apple juice instead! It makes a "sweet" smoke and gives meats a rich and appealing mahogany color.
Try it! Using one of those "pricey" basting brushes to apply barbecue sauce and other stuff?
Grilling pros use a good paint brush instead; it works better, lasts longer, and costs less. Then there's the cast iron skillet. Think it's for cooking in? No way! Putting it on top of meats helps them cook faster and brown better (with nice "sear" marks to boot!)
Finally, always turn meats with tongs instead of stabbing them with a fork (which lets all the tasty juices run out.)
Of course, you knew all that, didn't you? Now go ahead and run out for some apple juice and an atomizer; we won't tell!
Bonus Tip: Cleaning Disposals:
For the most part, garbage disposals are self-cleaning and virtually maintenance free.
However, a malfunctioning garbage disposal can mean a messy headache, but one that can be avoided.
Here are some ideas to keep your unit in good working order. Always run cold water when grinding in order to move the waste all the way through the drain lines.
Fats and grease congeal and harden in cold water which can then be flushed through the system.
Don't use hot water when grinding because it can dissolve fats and grease, which may then accumulate in the drain line.
Almost all biodegradable food waste can be fed into disposals. However, do not throw down the disposal clam or oyster shells, corn husks or other material with a high fiber content. Under no circumstances should you put glass, plastic or metal non-food materials through a disposal.
This includes bottle caps, tin covers or aluminum foil--these are some of the items service technicians commonly find in clogged or broken disposals.
Maintenance is easy. Grinding small bones and egg shells actually helps clean the disposal by scraping away stubborn deposits or citric acid and pulp. Grinding a little ice is another way to clean out deposits and get rid of odors.
And this is the tip of the week from Island True Value Tackle & Hardware.

Author

Super User

Super User

Carolina Beach North Carolina

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