Hardware Tip Of The Week: Auto Leak Diagnosis and Grilling Guru Secrets

By / Hardware Tips / Tuesday, 10 October 2017 04:00

Sponsored by:
ISLAND TRUE VALUE TACKLE & HARDWARE
801 N. Lake Park Blvd.   Carolina Beach, NC  28428 Phone: (910) 458-3049  
Fax: (910) 458-0988
www.islandtacklehardware.com

Drake brought in the world’s first oil-producing well in Titusville, Pa. Ever since, we’ve used his discovery for almost everything imaginable --notably in and for our automobiles. These days, we find traces of Drake’s discovery on the garage floor. Some are red, some green, while yet others are dark and greasy or clear and thin. We know something’s leaking, but what is it that’s leaking and what does it mean?
Here’s how to use yesterday’s news for a do-it-yourself auto diagnosis. Before you pull into the garage, cover the floor with newspaper. The next morning, after you back out, check the spots. Dark greasy droplets indicate an oil leak.
Clear oily stains might be brake fluids. Red drips are probably transmission fluid, and greenish puddles are anti-freeze in the coolant. Check the overnight drips for volume and color.
Grilling: Think you know barbecue grilling? Got all the answers for tasty outdoor cooking? Maybe not! Today you'll learn grilling secrets of the gurus and a few new tricks we'll bet you'll use. First, do you keep a plant atomizer handy? Maybe you do (filled with water to douse flare-ups), but grilling gurus fill it with apple juice instead! It makes a "sweet" smoke and gives meats a rich and appealing mahogany color. Try it! Using one of those "pricey" basting brushes to apply barbecue sauce and other stuff? Grilling pros use a good paint brush instead; it works better, lasts longer, and costs less.
Then there's the cast iron skillet. Think it's for cooking in? No way! Putting it on top of meats helps them cook faster and brown better (with nice "sear" marks to boot!) Finally, always turn meats with tongs instead of stabbing them with a fork (which lets all the tasty juices run out.)
Of course, you knew all that, didn't you? Now go ahead and run out for some apple juice and an atomizer; we won't tell!
And, run into Island True Value Tackle & Hardware for your propane refill.
Bonus Tips:
Security: Nothing ruins a great getaway like coming home to realize you’ve had unwelcome house guests.
To help avoid being burglarized take the following pre-vacation steps:
1. Call the post office to stop mail and suspend newspaper delivery
2. Get a few timers to turn several lights, the TV or radio on and off during the day and night
3. If you have a second car, park it in the driveway
4. If you’ll be gone long, ask 4. If you’ll be gone long, ask a neighbor to put some of their trash in your garbage cans
5. Ask a friend or neighbor to house sit by dropping by regularly and checking up on things and picking up junk mail and flyers that can accumulate. (Remember to describe this house sitter to your neighbors, so burglars can’t claim to be house sitting and house sitters don’t get arrested.)
6. If you have a baby monitor, leave the monitor with a neighbor and the base unit turned on at your home. If the security or smoke alarms go off, or if your neighbors hear something they shouldn’t, they can immediately call 911.
Saving Face: If you’re removing wood trim or moldings around doors or floors, here’s a way you can still reuse it for later installation. The point is to keep the woodwork smooth and splinter-free for refinishing.
The secret lies in never hammering the old nails out through the face from the backside. If you try to remove them this way the sunken finish nail heads will splinter the trim face as they’re driven upward from behind.
To prevent this and to keep the face intact, lay the woodwork down and pull the nails out from behind.
In order to do this, hold the nail up close to the wood with a pair of pliers and then slowly roll it over to draw it out of the wood. If you need more leverage for longer nails put a small wood block under the pliers. When the time comes for you to replace the trim, re-use the existing holes. You will also need to counter-sink the nail heads, and fill them with wood putty, sand and paint.
Installing Shelves: Installing shelves? Hanging a mirror? You’ll need more than drywall to hang them on. You need the solid backing of a “stud” the vertical 2x4’s behind finished walls. Here’s six ways to find them ranging from hi-tech to low-tech to no-tech and even “what the heck”.
• Most reliable is the hi-tech electronic stud finder that detects changes in density. Pass it over a wall and lights and tones tell when you’ve found a  stud. Some signal pipes, cable and wires too.
• “Low-tech” magnetic finders locate screws and nails but they also find wiring, pipes and air ducts that may be nowhere near a stud.
• “No-tech” methods include tapping and listening or noting where switches and outlets are installed and eyeball techniques like holding a light close to a wall and looking for nail heads and seams.
• Finally, the “what-the-heck” method involves drilling a hole and either being lucky enough to hit a stud or (if not) inserting a coat hanger and fishing around inside for a stud.
And that’s the Tip of the week from Island Tackle & Hardware.

Author

Super User

Super User

Carolina Beach North Carolina

Sunny
45°F
N at 21 mph /79%
Thursday
41°F / 52°F
Friday
40°F / 56°F
Saturday
55°F / 66°F

 

 

 

 

Please publish modules in offcanvas position.