Hardware Tips: Lemon Aid For Rust Stains and Ceramic Tile Over Vinyl Floors

By / Hardware Tips / Tuesday, 15 January 2019 01:07

Sponsored by:
ISLAND TRUE VALUE TACKLE & HARDWARE
801 N. Lake Park Blvd.   Carolina Beach, NC  28428 Phone: (910) 458-3049  Fax: (910) 458-0988
www.islandtacklehardware.com

Rust Stains: Let's say you're sitting around relaxing on your patio and just as you're about to squeeze some lemon into a nice cool drink you notice some annoying rust stains on the concrete caused by your aging metal outdoor furniture and being the perfectionist you are it bothers you, but what to do? Set down your drink and go in search of cleaning solutions and a wire brush?
No need, relax, the answer is at hand literally. Of course we mean the lemon you are holding in your hand.
First finish squeezing it into your drink, then simply reach down and rub what's left on the rust stains then wipe with a soft towel or cloth and presto mundo they'll disappear long before your summer guests arrive or your ice cubes melt.
Ceramic Tile: Ever since the “Roaring Twenties” ceramic tile floors have been the cat’s pajamas. But if you’ve already got a vinyl floor that’s looking kind of worn and shoddy how are you going to say “twenty-three skidoo”? Tear it up? Throw it out? Start from scratch? You don’t have to.
Here’s why -- and what to do. Even if your floor is worn, as long as it isn’t loose and coming up, you can put new ceramic tile directly on top easily. First, use a belt sander to score the vinyl surface.
Then apply two coats of bonding agent to help the adhesive hold better. Next carefully lay out chalk lines. Start laying tile from the center working outward toward the ends. Keep it simple; use pre-mixed mortar, working on small areas at a time.
Let it dry a full day before you grout, then use diluted white vinegar on a damp cloth to remove the haze and make it shine.
You won’t believe the difference. Your little bungalow soon will be looking like the Hearst castle -- and you’ll be putting on the Ritz.

Vinyl floors are beautiful when new. But soon, normal wear, and things that happen here and there, leave rips and gouges, burns and tears, that need attention and repairs.
If you have one or more tiles to replace, removing the vinyl tile -- one or a whole floor -- can be difficult and messy when you use a heat gun and chisel.
Instead, lay a cloth down over one tile at a time, and iron with slow, firm strokes. In a minute or two, the tile will easily lift up.
Then repeat as needed. If you’re replacing with self-stick tiles, they’ll go in easier and hold better if the adhesive is activated with heat.
Use a hairdryer or warm sunlight (if available) until they’re pliable. Then, peel and stick.
For holes, gouges and tears in tile or linoleum, shave a thin top layer off a matching scrap.
Grind or chop it into tiny pieces, mix with clear urethane paint and fill it into the damaged area and let it dry.

Bonus Tip: In 1859, Edwin Drake brought in the world's first oil-producing well in Titusville, Pa. Ever since, we've used his discovery for almost everything imaginable --notably in and for our automobiles. These days, we find traces of Drake's discovery on the garage floor. Some are red,
some green, while yet others are dark and greasy or clear and thin. We know something's leaking, but what is it that's leaking and what does it mean? Here's how to use yesterday's news for a do-it-yourself auto diagnosis. Before you pull into the garage, cover the floor with newspaper.
The next morning, after you back out, check the spots. Dark greasy droplets indicate an oil leak. Clear oily stains might be brake fluids. Red drips are probably transmission fluid, and greenish puddles are anti-freeze in the coolant. Check the overnight drips for volume and color.

And that’s the tip of the week from Island True Value Tackle and Hardware.

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