HHS Board To Consider Revised Rule Prohibiting Tobacco, E-cigarettesUse

HHS Board To Consider Revised Rule Prohibiting Tobacco, E-cigarettesUse

HHS Board To Consider Revised Rule Prohibiting Tobacco, E-cigarettesUse Featured

By / Local News / Monday, 10 August 2020 17:48

By WILLARD KILLOUGH III
Managing Editor

NEW HANOVER CTY  - The New Hanover County Health and human Services Board is considering  revising rules prohibiting the use of e-cigarretts and tobacco within the County.
According to a notice issued by the Board, "Notice is hereby given that, at its meeting on Tuesday, August 18, at 8 a.m., the New Hanover County Health and Human Services Board will consider the adoption of a revised rule that would prohibit the use of tobacco, including the use of electronic nicotine delivery systems (e-cigarettes) in New Hanover County." The proposed rule would prohibit the use of e-cigarettes and tobacco products within New Hanover County, Town and City Buildings as well as government vehicles and property.
That includes in public places in the County such as restaurants, bars and entertainment venues and  sidewalks."
According to a notice from the Board, "This is revised version of the rule adopted last December. Revisions include an exception to the rule in group therapeutic rehabilitation settings and an expansion further prohibiting tobacco and e-cigarette use on private sidewalks that are accessible to the public."
The public is invited to review this proposed rule and provide comments and feedback by noon on Friday, August 14. The Health and Human Services Board will review the drafted rule and comments at the August 18 meeting before voting. Residents may review the revised rule by clicking here, or obtaining a copy at the New Hanover County Health and Human Services building located at 1650 Greenfield St., Wilmington NC, 28401. Comments on the rule may be submitted online or by emailing This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with your name, address and comment.
The meeting will be held via teleconference and the public can listen to the meeting by dialing 415-655-0003 at 8 a.m. on Tuesday, August 18. When prompted for the meeting identification number, press 808 594 284, then the pound sign (#). If favorable, the rule will move to the Board of County Commissioners for their review and approval at a subsequent regular meeting before becoming effective.
To submit public comments on other Health and Human Services related topics, please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with your name, address and comments by noon on Monday, August 17, to be read aloud at the meeting on August 18.
For more information, visit Health.NHCgov.com
June 8th, 2018 - North Carolina teen tobacco use continues to climb, with youth use rising by 1.2 percent to 28.8 percent based on results of the 2017 N.C. Youth Tobacco Survey, released today by the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services. Data also show that 16.9 percent of North Carolina teens report using e-cigarettes, compared to 11.7 percent in the National Youth Tobacco Survey, also released today.
The state survey showed e-cigarettes have been the tobacco product most frequently used by middle and high school students in North Carolina since 2015.
"The use of e-cigarettes by youth is very concerning," said State Health Director and DHHS Chief Medical Officer Betsey Tilson, M.D., MPH. "Nicotine exposure during adolescence and young adulthood can lead to nicotine addiction and it harms brain development." Another indicator that e-cigarettes will continue to be popular among North Carolina youth is 23.3 percent of high school students said they were considering using the products in the coming year.
One brand of e-cigarettes holds more than 60 percent of the U.S. market and delivers more nicotine than most of its competitors. San Francisco-based JUUL brand’s popularity among youth may be related to the product’s resemblance to a USB flash drive, which makes it easy to conceal.
The allure of e-cigarettes is triggered by a friend or family member using them, surveyed North Carolina youth said. Nearly 25 percent of those surveyed also reported using e-cigarettes because they were available in flavors. The 2014 U.S. Surgeon General’s report, E-cigarette Use Among Youth and Young Adults, states that e-cigarette products are marketed in a variety of channels, including social media, that reach youth using themes and techniques found to be appealing to youth in conventional cigarette advertising and promotion.
"The marketing and flavors draw youth in; but the nicotine, which is highly addictive, keeps them coming back," said Susan Kansagra, M.D., MBA, chief of the Chronic Disease and Injury Section of the Division of Public Health. “Another worrisome trend we are seeing is that youth are using multiple tobacco products."
Half of high schoolers who use tobacco and nearly half of middle schoolers who use tobacco report using more than one tobacco product, which is similar to national data. Use of cigars, flavored little cigars and cigarillos by high school students increased from 2015 to 2017.
"The use of multiple products creates concern about nicotine exposure," added Dr. Kansagra. "There is also data showing that youth who use e-cigarettes are more likely to become regular cigarette smokers than those who do not.” The North Carolina survey is administered in the fall on odd-numbered years within randomly selected middle and high schools. More than 6,300 students representative of middle and high school peers across state participated in the 2017 survey.
M.D., MBA, chief of the Chronic Disease and Injury Section of the Division of Public Health. “Another worrisome trend we are seeing is that youth are using multiple tobacco products."
Half of high schoolers who use tobacco and nearly half of middle schoolers who use tobacco report using more than one tobacco product, which is similar to national data. Use of cigars, flavored little cigars and cigarillos by high school students increased from 2015 to 2017.
"The use of multiple products creates concern about nicotine exposure," added Dr. Kansagra. "There is also data showing that youth who use e-cigarettes are more likely to become regular cigarette smokers than those who do not.” The North Carolina survey is administered in the fall on odd-numbered years within randomly selected middle and high schools. More than 6,300 students representative of middle and high school peers across state participated in the 2017 survey.
Growing Number of NC Teens at Risk of Addiction to Nicotine, Study Finds
RALEIGH, N.C. : April 4th, 2019 - High school students are at risk of becoming addicted to nicotine, a fact confirmed by a North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services analysis of vaping devices confiscated from students at seven schools in various parts of the state.
Nicotine — the addictive drug found in cigarettes — was present in 85 percent of e-cigarette and vaping devices and containers analyzed by the department’s State Laboratory of Public Health found. However, youth are not always aware that e-cigarettes and vaping devices contain nicotine. A U.S. Monitoring the Future Study (2018) found that 11.5 percent of 8th–12th graders perceive they are “only vaping flavors” with no nicotine, and this percent increases with age. A Truth Initiative Study (2018) found that 63 percent of Juul users (age 15-24) did not know these products always contained nicotine.
For the last four years, e-cigarettes have been the most frequently used tobacco products among students in North Carolina. From 2011 to 2017, e-cigarette use by high school students increased nearly 900 percent with 16.9 percent reporting e-cigarette use in 2017.
Among middle school students, e-cigarette use increased by over 400 percent from 2011 to 2017. Use of e-cigarettes by students while in school poses health and safety risks and violates established tobacco-free school policies in North Carolina.
“The rise in use of e-cigarettes by youth is alarming,” said Dr. Elizabeth Tilson, State Health Director and Chief Medical Officer for DHHS. “We now have a new generation of youth at risk of becoming addicted to nicotine and they may not even know it. The use of nicotine by school-age children is a concern because human brain development continues to age 25. Early exposure to nicotine can negatively impact brain development, attention, learning and memory. It also can prime the brain for future addiction."
Conducted by the State Laboratory of Public Health in partnership with the Division of Public Health’s Tobacco Prevention and Control Branch and the NC Department of Public Instruction, the study found that of the 76 devices confiscated by schools, 33 (43 percent) were Juuls. Commercially sold Juul pods sold at that time are equal to about two packs of cigarettes. Products
like Juul resemble flash media drives used for storing and sharing files on computers. Due to increasing use by youth, North Carolina Attorney General Josh Stein launched an investigation into Juul marketing practices last year.Additionally, most e-liquids tested were flavored. The Food and Drug Administration and U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams have voiced concern that candy-flavored vaping products are particularly enticing to middle school and high school students.
While the FDA has authority over these products, according to the current FDA time-line, the products themselves would not begin to become fully regulated until August 2022.
QuitlineNC is North Carolina’s tobacco cessation program, which can help people quit e-cigarettes as well as other tobacco products. For free help to quit, call 1-800-QuitNow (1-800-784-8669) 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
Source: North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services.

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