Record Number Of Storms In Atlantic

Record Number Of Storms In Atlantic

Record Number Of Storms In Atlantic Featured

By / Local News / Tuesday, 15 September 2020 01:16

By WILLARD KILLOUGH III
Managing Editor

CAROLINA BEACH - With a record number of storms in the Atlantic ocean over the previous week, people should be reminded of the need to prepare sooner rather than to late for tropical storms and hurricanes.
While the temperatures are cooling in September, that doesn't mean North Carolina won't be a target for future storms. Florence dominated September a couple of years ago.
According to the National Hurricane Center on September 15th, They "Continued to issue advisories on five tropical cyclones over the Atlantic basin. This ties the record for the most number of tropical cyclones in that basin at one time, last set in September 1971. The tropical cyclones are Hurricane Paulette, located north of Bermuda; Tropical Depression Rene, located over the central Atlantic; Hurricane Sally, centered over the north-central Gulf of Mexico; Tropical Storm Teddy, located over the east-central tropical Atlantic; and Tropical Storm Vicky, located over the eastern tropical Atlantic."
According to NOAA, "Elsewhere over the Atlantic basin on this Monday afternoon, a broad area of low pressure over the southwestern Gulf of Mexico is producing disorganized showers and thunderstorms. Upper-level winds are not particularly conducive for development, and any development of this system should be slow to occur while it moves slowly southwestward. It has a low (20 percent) chance of formation during the next five days.  There's also a tropical wave located over the far eastern tropical Atlantic, producing disorganized shower and thunderstorm activity.  Environmental conditions appear to be conducive for slow development of the system this week as it moves westward at 10 to 15 mph. It has a medium (50 percent) chance of formation during the next five days. www.hurricanes.gov"
North Carolina and three other southern states lead the nation in the number of billion-dollar weather-related disasters since 1980.  Most of those disasters are tropical-storm related.
The North Carolina coast is the most vulnerable to a direct hurricane strike, but inland cities and towns across the state can also be devastated by the high winds and potential tornados, storm surges, flooding and landslides from hurricanes and tropical storms.
During hurricane season, from June 1 to November 30, you should have a family emergency plan in place and a family emergency supplies kit assembled.
Also:
Know your evacuation routes and locate your local emergency shelters.
Don't get caught by surprise. There is not enough time to think of everything you need to do when a hurricane gets close.
As a hurricane moves closer to your area, begin monitoring the weather reports every hour.
Listen for hurricane watches and warnings.
Put fuel in all vehicles and withdraw some cash from the bank. Gas stations
and banks may be closed after a hurricane.
If authorities ask you to evacuate, do so promptly.
If you evacuate, be alert to flooded or washed-out roads. Just a few inches of water can float a car.  Remember:  Turn Around, Don't Drown.
Keep a photo I.D. that shows your home address. This may become important when asking a police
officer or National Guard member for permission to re-enter your neighborhood.
There is never enough time to get ready for nature's fiercest weather. Give yourself and your family a head start.

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