County Sheriff's Department Reminding People To Vaccinate Pets For Rabies

County Sheriff's Department Reminding People To Vaccinate Pets For Rabies

County Sheriff's Department Reminding People To Vaccinate Pets For Rabies Featured

By / Local News / Tuesday, 30 March 2021 02:07

By WILLARD KILLOUGH III
Managing Editor

NEW HANOVER CTY - The New Hanover County Sheriff's Department is warning people to make sure their pets are up to date on their rabies vaccinations after some animals tested positive for the deadly virus in recent weeks.
According to the Sheriff's Department, "The New Hanover County Sheriff’s Office Animal Services Unit wants to remind you to keep your pet’s rabies vaccinations up to date due to a couple of animals in Wilmington that tested positive for rabies. Also if you encounter an animal that appears to have rabies to call 911, and keep all pets away from the rabid animal."
The Sheriff's Department explained, "It’s important to avoid all contact with the animal suspected of having rabies. There have been 2 confirmed cases of rabies in New Hanover County in the last 2 weeks. One was in the Sunset Park area, and the other in the county off Middle Sound Loop Rd. If you have any questions, please contact Animal Services Unit at 910-798-7500."
According to the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services the Rabies virus is a disease that attacks the nervous system of warm-blooded animals, particularly mammals.
According to State officials, "In North Carolina, the most common type of rabies is raccoon-variant rabies. It is found commonly in raccoons, skunks, red and grey foxes, coyotes, wolves, groundhogs and beavers. Bats can also transmit rabies but have their own bat variant rabies virus. Any mammal can become infected with rabies. The virus can infect domestic pets, agricultural animals such as cows and horses, and people when they are exposed to rabid wildlife."
If your pet is not currently vaccinated and is bitten by an animal that is or might be rabid, animal control is required by law to either quarantine the pet for six months or euthanize it (NCGS 130A-197 External link). That choice must be made by the local health director.
If you are bitten or scratched by any animal, clean the wound out well with soap and running water for 15 minutes and contact your doctor. Be certain to write down the location of the animal and a description of the animal to provide to animal control. Do not try to catch any wild animal that bites or scratches you. Call animal control immediately to capture the animal for rabies testing. If the animal is someone's pet, also get the owner's name and address and give them to the animal control officer. Any mammal can transmit rabies. The animal that bit you, depending on the species and circumstances, will have to be evaluated or tested for rabies. For dogs, cats, and ferrets, animal control may be able to locate the animal based on the information you provide, and place the animal in 10-day confinement as designated by the local health director (NCGS 130A-196).

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