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Back You are here: Home Columns Weekly Columns For Your Consideration For Your Consideration: Incredulous

For Your Consideration: Incredulous

By CHARLIE ALLO
Contributing Writer

If anyone is bothering to keep up with the antics of the government and the various bureaucracies, they are surely finding it harder and harder to accept the explanations that are being given for what is going on’ if this trend continues in the current vein it will erode any trust a citizen has in the stated objectives of the government.
With each passing generation it is becoming clearer that our government is not here to serve the public, but rather for the public to serve the government. The individual’s freedom is rapidly dissipating, and the individual is increasingly becoming a ward of the state; this is just what our Founders warned us about when they drafted the Declaration of Independents and Constitution. It would appear that the government’s motivation is to turn the individual into a responsible ward of the state, the only conclusion that one can draw from this is that the government does not want individuals to develop into self-reliant responsible individuals that have little or no need for government or its bureaucratic agencies.
Given mans’ predilection to abuse the concept of freedom, it is doubtful that the species will ever be able to totally remove the need for government.
The problem with the course that the government is taking at this point is that it is enabling a segment of the population, the government, to run free with the various behaviors that need to be blocked within a society. How often does man need to go through this cycle to realize that it winds up in the same place, with two distinctive classes, the privileged (the government) and the serfs (the general population).
The contrast between the wages in the private sector and those in the public sector has been cited frequently, these comparisons have shown that the public sector has a distinct advantage over those in the private sector. The rationale given for this divergence is that it’s necessary to get highly qualified personnel, but one has to question this reasoning given the performance results within many of the government agencies.
There are two major distinct differences between the public and private sectors; it’s almost impossible to discharge a worker in the public sector, and many of the fringe benefits far exceed those of the private sector.
It would appear that it’s not important to provide an improved service at a lower cost; the government seems to function under the concept that additional capital is required. When an increase in funding is received the effectiveness is decreased; however, the wages, benefits, and bonuses continue to go up. Care should be exercised in not applying the generalized statements to all public service workers; there are many public service workers that are just as frustrated as the people they are trying to serve.
There are steps that can be taken to improve the public sector, and just about anyone in the private sector that has a grasp on most of the basic management principles could point out the shortcomings within the public sector. The first thing that should be corrected is the inability to discharge a worker that is not performing up to a given standard. The standards at this point become a very important part of this factor; the standards should be clear and concise, taking into consideration the level attained and the amount of time a worker has had on the job and the training that has been provided. There are many variables that need to be applied in this portion of the evaluation, and just as much attention should be givern to the standards to ensure that the standards are fulfilling the desired results. This last evaluation requires a manager with good management skills. Wages, benefits, and bonuses should be tied to work performance and length of service; this is another area that requires a great deal of thought if it is going to function correctly. It would be nice to see these basic points being addressed by the administration, but this outcome does not seem likely.